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Blog Tour Review - Service Model by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Blog Tour Review - Service Model by Adrian Tchaikovsky To fix the world they first must break it further. Humanity is a dying breed, utterly reliant on artificial labor and service. When a domesticated robot gets a nasty little idea downloaded into their core programming, they murder their owner. The robot then discovers they can also do something else they never did before: run away. After fleeing the household, they enter a wider world they never knew existed, where the age-old hierarchy of humans at the top is disintegrating, and a robot ecosystem devoted to human wellbeing is finding a new purpose. There is so much to love in Service Model, but one of the things I most love about it is the peculiar blend of charming innocence and insightful cynicism. Uncharles the domestic robot is such a simple soul (though he would state that he has no soul and this is an inaccurate description). He approaches the end of the world with optimism and hope, or whatever equivalent to these emotions h

Review - Libby and the Parisian Puzzle by Jo Clarke

 Review - Libby and the Parisian Puzzle by Jo Clarke

Mystery-lover Libby is excited but nervous when she's sent to live with her aunt while her mother is working abroad.

Aunt Agatha is the headmistress of an extraordinary travelling school that moves from country to country. Libby joins it in Paris, where she is just starting to find her feet when her aunt is arrested, accused of a daring jewel robbery.

Can Libby and her new best friend Connie find the real thief and save her aunt?




I really enjoyed this, the first travelling schools mystery. The characters were fun, with a great relationship between Libby and Connie that felt lively and realistic. The mystery is one of the strongest parts of this book, and it totally drew me in with all the shiny jewels and mysterious people meeting all over Paris. 

Once the pieces began to fall into place, I was still gripped, wondering how it was all going to play out. The sense of place is also really strong, drawing on a wide range of Parisian sites, food and landmarks to really give the feeling that the city is an important character in the story. I'm interested in seeing how this is continued in future books in the series.

Oh, and the whole thing left me absolutely craving pastries!

๐ŸŒ•๐ŸŒ•๐ŸŒ•๐ŸŒ•๐ŸŒ‘

Libby and the Parisian Puzzle by Jo Clarke is out now and is published by Firefly Press.

I was given a review copy via Netgalley in return for an honest review.

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